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More Thoughts About Boswellia serrata

      In my 50 plus years of editing and publishing in medical journals, only 1 article has prompted lay readers to write to me—a 2018 editorial about arthritis and Boswellia serrata.
      • Shader RI.
      An anecdote about arthritis and Boswellia serrata.
      Two individuals, both of whom had arthritis in their hands that was unresponsive to conventional therapies, read my editorial, tried B serrata, and contacted me via e-mail and disclosed their experiences. One, a man who provided no details about himself other than his nonresponse to what his physicians prescribed, wrote in 2020, “I am using Boswellia now and already, everything is calming down.” The second person, also in 2020, was a woman who shared photographs and radiographs of her confirmed "interphalangeal joint erosive osteoarthritis.” Included with detailing her unsuccessful therapies, she humorously added, “Goodness the cell phone makes my hands look OLD!” She later wrote about how she finally responded well to 1500 mg of B serrata. I was prompted to write this letter based on these recently received e-mails providing very positive feedback regarding the effectiveness of the herbal supplement for osteoarthritis (OA). Because I also benefit from Boswellia, these anecdotes prompt me to continue to wonder who responds and who does not. My sister, for example, who has OA, did not benefit at all from a trial.
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      References

        • Shader RI.
        An anecdote about arthritis and Boswellia serrata.
        Clin Ther. 2018 May; 40: 669-671https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2018.04.008
        • Bannuru RR
        • Osani MC
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        • et al.
        Efficacy of curcumin and Boswellia for knee osteoarthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis.
        Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2018 Dec; 48: 416-429https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semarthrit.2018.03.001
        • Yu G
        • Xiang W
        • Zhang T
        • et al.
        Effectiveness of Boswellia and Boswellia extract for osteoarthritis patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
        BMC Complement Med Ther. 2020 Jul 17; 20 (PMID:32680575PMCID: PMC7368679): 225https://doi.org/10.1186/s12906-020-02985-6
        • Sanchez C
        • Zappia J
        • Lambert C
        • et al.
        Curcuma longa and Boswellia serrata extracts modulate different and complementary pathways on human chondrocytes in vitro: deciphering of a transcriptomic study.
        Front Pharmacol. 2022 Aug 11; 13931914
        • Shader RI.
        More thoughts about Boswellia serrata.
        Clin Ther. 2022; (this issue)
      1. Mole B. An herbal remedy caused the death of California congressman's wife. https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/08/an-herbal-remedy-caused-the-death-of-ca-congressmans-wife/Accessed September 7, 2022.

        • Majeed M
        • Nagabhushanam K
        • Lawrence L
        • Nallathambi R
        • Thiyagarajan V
        • Mundkur L.
        Boswellia serrata extract containing 30% 3-acetyl-11keto-Boswellic acid attenuates inflammatory mediators and preserves extracellular matrix in collagen-induced arthritis.
        Front Physiol. 2021 Sep 28; 12735247