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Corrigendum to: “Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with Altered Abundance of Exosomal MicroRNAs in Human Milk” [Clin Therapeut 44(2) (2022) 172-185]

      The authors regret that a paragraph was missing from the Results section within the abovementioned article. This missing paragraph has now been added to the article online, and has also been included below.
      The following paragraph has been included as the last paragraph of the “Clinical Characteristics of Monther-Infant Dyads” section, which is the first section within the Results:
      Infants born to mothers with GDM weighed less than infants born to mothers without GDM, and had lower fat-free mass at 1 month of age, but this difference was not present at 3- or 6-months (Table II). No difference in % body fat and fat mass was observed between groups at 1-, 3-, and 6 months of age. All the infants at 1 month of age were exclusively breast fed by study design. Exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months postpartum was more common in mothers without GDM than in mothers who had GDM.

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      • Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with Altered Abundance of Exosomal MicroRNAs in Human Milk
        Clinical TherapeuticsVol. 44Issue 2
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          Nutrition in the early postnatal period plays an important role in infant growth and the developmental programming of metabolic disease susceptibility later in life.1,2 Breastfeeding is an ideal source of nutrients, playing a crucial role in nutritional programming in the growing infant.3 The benefits of human milk (HM) may be mediated by a variety of bioactive factors, such as hormones, immunoglobulins, oligosaccharides, growth factors, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs),4 influencing infant growth and body composition in early life.
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