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Safety and Success of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Time for a Robust Vaccination Program in the United States and Worldwide

      Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women and the seventh most common cancer in the world, with an estimated 530,000 new cases in 2008.

      World Cancer Research Fund International. Cervical cancer – third most common cancer in women. http://www.wcrf.org/cancer_statistics/cancer_facts/cervical_cancer.php. Accessed November 10, 2013.

      In the United States, where there is an established and successful screening program, the cervical cancer death rate decreased by 70% between 1955 and 1970.
      • Landis S.H.
      • Murray T.
      • Bolden S.
      • Wingo P.A.
      Cancer statistics, 1999.
      However, cervical cancer is still common in less developed countries, with 454,000 cases in 2008.

      World Cancer Research Fund International. Cervical cancer – third most common cancer in women. http://www.wcrf.org/cancer_statistics/cancer_facts/cervical_cancer.php. Accessed November 10, 2013.

      Cervical cancer is predominantly a disease of low-income countries, with overall rates nearly twice as high in less developed regions compared with more developed regions. In addition, despite screening, cervical cancer cases still occur in the United States and women still die of cervical cancer. Projected total number of cervical cancer cases and deaths for the United States in 2013 are 12,340 and 4030, respectively.
      • Siegel R.
      • Naishadham D.
      • Jemal A.
      Cancer statistics, 2013.
      These US cervical cancer cases may be due to lack of access to care (lack of insurance, for example) or less likely screening failures.
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      References

      1. World Cancer Research Fund International. Cervical cancer – third most common cancer in women. http://www.wcrf.org/cancer_statistics/cancer_facts/cervical_cancer.php. Accessed November 10, 2013.

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